Theorizing: The Greek Dialectical Method as a Precursor for the Scientific Method

The Socratic Method and Aristotle’s work in philosophy and science are excellent case studies for demonstrating the essence of ancient Greek philosophy and dialectic, as well as the links these philosophies have with logical thought and physical science.

Etymology: The Origin of the Word "Meat"

I looked into the history of the word meat, and this led me to wonder about other edible animals, so I researched the words meat, pork, beef and mutton.

Analysis of William Waterhouse's Various Renditions of the Lady of Shallot

  Section 1: The Work and its Historical/Cultural Context Arguably the most famous piece by painter and drafter John William Waterhouse, The Lady of Shallot depicts an emotionally evocative scene on an ancient theme: the fabled medieval city of Camelot.  The work's creation in 1888 was inspired by a poem by the same name which … Continue reading Analysis of William Waterhouse's Various Renditions of the Lady of Shallot

Art Deco: An Artistic Response to Industrialization

The Art Deco Movement of 1925 - 1940 marks a time of exuberant excess, and is characterized by bright and linear ornamentation in visual art, geometric elegance in fashion, and hard-edged decoration in architecture.  Artists, architects and designers of the time sought to embellish all things tangible, from the largest skyscraper facades to the smallest … Continue reading Art Deco: An Artistic Response to Industrialization

Memoir: Sex

In my mind, sex has always been enticing. Even bad sex can be better than none at all...

Shakespeare: A Jaded Poet?

In searching for themes among William Shakespeare’s plays, I observed numerous parallels between the views that the poet chose to assert regarding love and romance in Midsummer Night’s Dream and Twelfth Night.  It’s confusing, really, to try to determine exactly what his position on the love actually was. The story Shakespeare tells in the plays … Continue reading Shakespeare: A Jaded Poet?

On Margaret Atwood's "The Female Body"

In 1990, Margaret Atwood wrote a semi-autobiographical piece in response to a letter from the Michigan Quarterly Review. Using the witticisms, ironic humor and autobiographical excerpts which characterize her uniquely poignant style of writing, she introduces a collage of seven definitions for the female form. Rife with feminism and sarcastic metaphor, this jaunt into various … Continue reading On Margaret Atwood's "The Female Body"

The Biochemistry of Affection: Love, Scientifically

Why do we do what we do when we get a case of the Lovesies... Chemicals such as neurotransmitters, sex hormones, and neuropeptides are responsible for the behaviors humankind exhibits, as well as the moods they experience during attraction, dating, sex, and love. The effect of these chemicals is fairly intense, especially in comparison to … Continue reading The Biochemistry of Affection: Love, Scientifically

On Hume’s Dialogues and Argument from Design

In an unprecedented treatise on the fallacies of conventional religious belief and the limitations of certain types of logic in understanding the nature of God, 18th Century philosopher David Hume introduced an innovative, skeptical view on religious thought.

Enlightenment and Progress

Some scholars assert that ideas were the main force for the progress achieved in the Enlightenment efforts, while others view certain social and economic forces as being the primary reasons for transformation.